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George Segal – Oscar Nominated Veteran Actor Passes Away at 87

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Two times Golden Globe winner and a well-trained banjo player George Segal took his last breath on Tuesday. Segal was 87 years old, and as her spouse said to Sony TV, that issue related to bypass surgery was the actual cause of his death.

George Segal was the five times Golden Globe nominee besides being a great human being. Movie lovers will always recall the finest comic timings on screen, like the 70’s movie “Where’s Poppa?” Where the actor was at his younger time.

One of the close people of Segal, his long-time agent, said to Sony TV as he recalls the actor, he will miss the warmth, humor, and friendship that they had shared. He was an exquisite person – also added.

George Segal was born on 13th February in 1934, and he was a veteran actor with an unchanged Jewish surname. He told The New York Times that he didn’t change his name because he didn’t think George Segal is an unwieldy name. He had found his interest in acting after watching Alan Ladd in ‘This Gun for Hire.’ Segal started playing banjo at a young age.

Segal was in the United States Army before pursuing his acting career. Then he studied acting with Uta Hagen and Lee Strasberg. George has continued his Broadway career and appeared in Antony and Cleopatra, Gideon. Segal got his first break in 1961 as he received a contract from Columbia Pictures. The film was based on Arthur Hailey’s novel, directed by Phil Karlson named “The Young Doctors,” starting with Ben Gazzara. In a medical drama named “The New Interns,” he got a Golden Globe Award in 1964. Segal came up with athleticism and sex in ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ for debutante director Mike Nichols in 1966. Nichols directed Segal for a broadway named ‘The Knack,’ this film got a nomination for best picture in Academy Award, and also for this role, he got nominated in Golden Globe and Oscar.

How the career of George Segal took off?

George played the lead role in Bye Bye Braeman with Robert Redfort(1968), appeared in the rom-com Blume in Love(1973), his one of best work was dark comedy film “Where’s Poppa?’’ directed by Carl Reiner. In 1973, Segal played an unfaithful husband in a movie called ‘A Touch of Class’, that film brought a second Golden Globe Award for best actor. Glenda Jackson received an Oscar, who was working opposite Segal in this film. During this time, Segal appeared in many other leading roles like ‘No Way to Treat a Lady’(1968), starring Barbara Streisand ‘The Owl and the Pussycat’(1970), appeared in ‘Of Mice and Men’ and ‘Death of a Salesman.’

The comeback story

An actor’s life will never be the same as George also faced rejection and replaced Dudley Moore for Edward’s comedy ‘10’ in 1979. Once he stated how he loved the variety of roles and how he loved all characters. Nevertheless, he came back with a bang, his most acclaimed role as Jack Gallo, in Just Shoot Me!, he got another nomination for best actor in Golden Globe Award. He also worked as a voice actor in Studio Ghibli’s The Tale of the Princess Kaguya. Segal marked his presence in movies like 2012 in 2009 and Heights in 2005. 

Segal’s career has taken flight for the last eight years as he appeared as an unusual grandfather (Albert ‘Pops’ Solomon) in a family-based series ‘TheGoldbergs’(2013-2021). This show starred Jeff Garlin, Wendi McLendon-Covey. It is a semi auto-biography based on Goldberg’s life and family. Before his last breath, he shot the last episode, which will air on 7th April.

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